Lifestyle changes that help manage osteoporosis

Health

Lifestyle changes that help manage osteoporosis

Health

The bones in our body are in a constant state of restoration. This process of destroying and creating bone mass reaches its peak by 30 for most adults. However, if the bone mass cannot be replaced at the pace of being lost, it leads to osteoporosis. And as a person grows old, bone deterioration becomes even more severe. The good news is that simple lifestyle changes can help prevent or better manage most risk factors.

Changes in food intake
Consuming foods and beverages low in calcium and vitamin D can result in a nutrient deficiency that speeds up bone loss. Hence, one’s daily food intake must be supplemented with green veggies (like kale, broccoli, spinach, and different greens), fresh fruits (bananas, oranges, and grapefruit), low-fat dairy products (milk, yogurt, and cheese), and various types of seafood (salmon, tuna, sardines, and mackerel).

Supplements
The side effects of medications can interfere with the bone mass restoration process. Also, if a person has undergone gastric surgery, it may affect the body’s ability to absorb natural nutrients, triggering deficiencies that lead to osteoporosis. In such cases, calcium, vitamin D, and other active nutrient-based supplements are suggested to replenish the daily requirements. These supplements can be taken at home as advised by the nutritionist.

Lifestyle choices
Leading a sedentary lifestyle is one of the significant risk factors for osteoporosis. Lack of activity prompts fat gain, affecting the body’s posture and balance. This puts pressure on the bones while walking, running, or performing any strenuous activity. So, to avoid stress fractures, doctors recommend performing weight-bearing and resistance training exercises. These help build and enhance muscles around vital bone joints, providing additional support. Smoking, tobacco, and alcohol consumption also have a deteriorating effect on bone health. While it may be tough to quit altogether, doctors recommend cutting back gradually.

Managing other medical conditions
Existing medical conditions can trigger problems linked to bone mass production and density. Those with celiac disease, liver disease, kidney disease, certain cancers, multiple myeloma, inflammatory bowel disease, or even rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of osteoporosis. Certain eating disorders can also impact the type of food one consumes. Therefore, eating superfoods suggested for overcoming discomforts linked to these medical conditions can help reduce the inherent risk of osteoporosis.